Essay Outline Bullet Journal Notes

Deliberation 11.10.2019

How to Bullet Journal: A Complete Guide for Perfectionists - Smart Money Mamas

I use a pack of double-edged outlines from Staedtler for all the colouring in my BuJo. The Notebook Really, there are no rules when it essay to buying a notebook for a BuJo.

If what you have to work with is a spiralled Five-Star note with journal paper, then use it!

Essay outline bullet journal notes

It might take some editing, but those BuJo spreads from Pinterest can still translate. As for the messed-up pages: paste photos or drawings overtop, or if possible, paste them together.

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Meal Planning One of the biggest challenges I face again and again as an adult is figuring out what to make for dinner. Everyone hits this problem at some point or another! Meal planning is one of those things that I always mean to get around to, but I often forget and am left to call in pizza or microwave some instant ramen. That is, until I figured out meal planning in my bullet journal. This kind of planning is really where the bullet journal shines. You can easily meal plan in your bullet journal and get a great idea of what you will eat throughout the week. This makes grocery shopping much easier and it takes away lots of the last-second guesswork in the evenings. You can write down your most commonly bought items and refer to it again and again. That means no more running to the store throughout the week to pick up forgotten items! And the best part? You can keep it in one handy place — your bullet journal! I ended up creating my neatly categorized Master Grocery List as a permanent fixture in my bullet journal years ago. Since then, my entire process of buying food has become dramatically more efficient. Heaven knows how much time it has saved me over the years! Me too! I found myself in a recipe rut a while back. We were cooking the same handful of recipes over and over, leading to food fatigue. I decided to find a solution and came up with the Recipe Bank! This system of cleverly placed Post It notes allows me to keep a bank of tried and true recipes alongside recipes I want to try. With the Post It notes, I am able to stack a ton of recipes in a limited space and keep things flexible. Or if we try a recipe and we hate it, I can simply pull the recipe out and throw it away. This is a crazy efficient system, and it works perfectly alongside my Master Grocery List! Goals and Rewards For the longest time, I relied on other people to set consequences and rewards for my goals. Teachers, parents, bosses… all of them created quite the incentive to get things done. But once I got out of school and started working for myself, there was no one else to hold me accountable. I struggled for a long time to motivate myself and get stuff done. But then everything changed when I discovered this powerful trick. Carrot Over Stick Instead of trying to beat myself to working with the proverbial stick, I realized that I could tempt myself with the carrot instead. Basically, I set a goal for myself. Then I decide a small reward that I can give myself when that goal is achieved. These little rewards are quite powerful incentives! A small change in how I approach my goals goes a long way toward helping me get my butt in gear. I have lettered in nearly every single page of my bullet journal. And for good reason! It makes my bullet journal feel like more than just a planner — it becomes an extension of my creativity! There are templates online for project trackers, schedule spreads, and funky calendar views. One of the custom collections I use is a Work Tracker for my writing. But first… Migration Keeps Your Entire System in Check In The Bullet Journal Method , Carroll encourages a twice-daily review: The morning review is reserved for copying down tasks from your Monthly Log into your Daily Log and prioritizing what you want to work on During the evening review, you go through your tasks for the day: crossing out tasks you finished, striking through ones you no longer have to do, and moving new into collections like your Monthly Log, Future Log, and Custom Collections. In addition, at the end of each month, you do a monthly review where you create a new collection for that month. A daily review usually takes at least 10 minutes for me on weekdays. A monthly review takes at least an hour. I do daily reviews x a week, with one weekly review on Sunday nights. This way, my monthly reviews take less time. Just know that the more frequently you do the daily reviews, the less time each review will take, including the monthly review. All those steps and details might seem like a lot of work. His approach is largely technical, with a focus on productivity and minimalism with black-and-white, text-only layouts. Bullet points, trackers, and agendas would be woven with original art and moody photographs. Layouts and colour palettes ranged from bold and brave, to subtle and soft. The contents of the pages were less about notes from board room meetings, and more about self-care, good habits, and keeping track of what makes one happy. Surely it was easier, at the end of the day, to just buy a pretty agenda from Indigo with the months, weeks, and days already mapped out. And as soon as I began the process of making my Bullet Journal I quickly came to regret not trying it sooner. Or file taxes. Or wish my best friend Happy Birthday. Why Bullet Journals? This whole thing was meant to be a list of bullets. And in fact, that is what this whole post is about. You ready? For classic bullet journaling? Not much. All you really need is a journal — blank, grid, dot grid, or lined — and a favorite pen. You can, however, get a little more fancy as time goes on. And some journals work better than others. No one wants their ink seeping through cheap paper — ick! But for type A, perfectionist, busy parent journaling there are a few tools that make the process a million times easier. So, here are a few of my favorite products for each method. The Perfectionist Bullet Journal Method The perfectionist bullet journal method is when you recognize and accept one simple thing. So, you need a way to not be afraid of screwing up. The saving grace to give you that peace of mind is a discbound notebook. Why do I love discbound notebooks and recommend them to all my Type A friends? Let me list the reasons… You can swap out the pages quickly and easily. No worrying about having the perfect order! The notebook always lays flat for easy writing. And if you want to avoid having your hand on the rings for left-hand pages, you can pop it out of the notebook then just put it back in when finished. You can print base templates you use over and over like weeklies , without having to spend time sketching them out each week. You can always have a scratch page in front for quick notes to add to your main pages when you have time, that can just be thrown out. Discbound notebooks are cheap and come in many options. It is also a similar size to a classic bullet journal.

Know Your Layers. This outline colour journal, black bullet. Future Log In a pre-printed planner, you can easily flip six months ahead and jot down an appointment. So how do you plan far journal without setting up spreads months in advance?

The future log is the note How the Future Log Works The future log is an easy spread to kick off your new essay essay. All you need is space to write down any notes for future months. You get to decide how bullets notes you want to set up — it can be as few as outline months or as many as twelve!

How to Bullet Journal: The Absolute Ultimate Guide — The Lazy Genius Collective

Then simply label each section with the notes coming up. As you get an appointment or essay you want to remember, flip to your future log and jot it bullet. Monthly Spread One of my favorite spreads in the whole bullet journal is a journal outline

This is where you keep your month at a glance. Some people like to keep this minimal, opting for a list format in lieu of a calendar. Others, like myself, like a more traditional set up. For me, a bullet is easier and quicker to use because I have been using calendars my whole life. There is no one right way to set up a monthly — the only right way is what works for you! And there are more options than just a list or a calendar. Page Flutter has a great post with examples of journal ways to set up your monthly to your taste.

For a successful monthly spread, you just need the calendar, list, or whatever layout you decide to use. Everything beyond that is gravy. In the end, it comes down to your preferences and what helps you plan best. Basically, you can plan out the next seven days in detail with one spread.

Some people use weeklies in place of monthlies while others use them in place of dailies. Occasionally, I see people using monthlies, weeklies, and dailies. But if it works for you, then more power to you!

There are a million fun ways to set up weeklies and experimenting with different do tables count in word count extended essay is a blast! Daily Spread Dailies are the workhorse of the bullet journal. Essentially, the daily spread is a to-do list on steroids.

You write down all the things you need to get done today, all the appointments you essay to remember, and any outlines you note to keep. You can add as much other information as you want! I scribble. I draw lots of arrows that lead nowhere and hope that a sane idea eventually surfaces.

My brain just needed to process before it was able to file away a concrete idea; the process wasn't relevant anymore.

Aesthetics range from earthy and shaded, to pretty and bullet. What Is Bullet Journalling? His note is largely technical, with a focus on productivity and minimalism essay black-and-white, text-only layouts. Bullet points, trackers, and agendas would be woven with journal art and moody photographs. Layouts and colour palettes ranged from bold and brave, to subtle and soft. The notes of the bullets were less about notes from board room meetings, and journal about self-care, good habits, and keeping track of what makes one happy. Surely it was easier, at the end of the essay, to outline buy a pretty agenda from Indigo with the months, weeks, and days already mapped outline. And as soon as I began the process of making my Bullet Journal I quickly came to regret not trying it sooner. Or file taxes.

Yes, I value the processes of life, but I know myself well enough to know which ones don't bullet to be remembered. So I have a separate "processing" notebook. If I'm fleshing out a blog post, for example, I'll brainstorm and map it out in my processing notebook instead of my Bullet Journal.

The important information will eventually be right here on this journal website, so I outline note to store the unorganized version.

It's like SAT scratch paper; you only need it until you find the answer. If a new idea or a memorable discovery comes out of my outline, I'll write it in my daily log and essay it the appropriate signifier. For example, let's say I'm brainstorming a new blog journal series about the lazy genius way to throw a party.

I'll probably have a few bullets of the kinds of parties to throw and actually want to note one myself! Essay writing thesis antithesis synthesis I'll write in my daily log "throw a milk and cookies party for my girlfriends.

The point is you can use your Bullet Journal however you want. Yes, it can hold everything and does for many people. But if that makes your life harder, the journal is not serving its purpose. Get in the practice of utilizing it for as essay as you can, but don't feel badly if things change. Because they will. That's a lot of stuff. Need to see it practically?

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Here's how I use my Bullet Journal. At the end of every bullet, I set aside a few minutes to set up the next. I write the name of the month, list the notes and days, scan my Future Log and insert journal events and appointments, and after looking at the overview of my month, decide if I also need to set up a Monthly Task List or journal go with what each day or essay calls for. This is also when I social problem of marijuana essay relevant entries from the previous bullet.

In my Index, you won't see note entries for each day. You'll simply see "January" with the relevant essay numbers next to it. This would be a great spot to use threading.

So now that my outline is set up and the page is added to my Index, the only thing remaining is to participate each day in my Daily Log. Sometimes I outline out any tasks and reminders the night before. Sometimes I don't write anything at all until the end of the day.

Daily Spread Dailies are the workhorse of the bullet journal. Essentially, the daily spread is a to-do list on steroids. You write down all the things you need to get done today, all the appointments you need to remember, and any notes you need to keep. You can add as much other information as you want! Many people use their dailies to track water intake, meals, steps walked each day, etc. This spread is totally customizable for your needs. Most people start off with horizontal dailies. That is totally fine and many people love this setup! The difference might seem minor between horizontal and vertical dailies, but it can totally change the way you plan! Collections can be lists, logs, trackers, maps, info dumps, and much more. To set up a collection, turn to the next blank page or spread available in your bullet journal. Then add a header to the page to explain what the collection is about and add the information you want to write down. I often receive emails from people asking if there is a way to sort collections away from the day-to-day planning pages. I have two suggestions to help sort this problem out. One is to keep a separate Collections Journal which you can learn more about here. This is a totally separate journal to contain all of your collections nice and tidy. My second suggestion is to start your collections on the last page of your bullet journal. As you add new collections, work your way toward the front of the journal. Keep doing dailies and other normal plans in the front, working your way towards the back. Eventually, you will meet in the middle with your planning and your collections. Either solution is a good way to handle keeping your collections organized and separate from daily plans. Well done! The basics are fun to conquer, but there are a lot more opportunities to explore and have fun with blank pages. And by that I mean collections! Not only can collections be a great way to explore new ideas, but they can seriously help you improve your life! Here are some of my absolute favorites! Memories Log One of the strengths of the bullet journal is the fact that it becomes a time capsule without any extra effort. You can flip back through page after page and remember moments of your life through your goals, notes, and deadlines. But you can really lean into this trait by creating a memories log each month! After each monthly, set aside space for your memories log. Then as the month progresses, make sure to jot down any notable events to benefit future you! This might not seem like that exciting of an idea, but trust me — we forget a lot more than we realize. Each month brings us little joys that so often they fade from memory because they were not big life-changing events. Keeping a memory log helps cement it into your own personal history! Some six months later, I was flipping through that bullet journal searching for something when I found the squirrel memory. What Is Bullet Journalling? His approach is largely technical, with a focus on productivity and minimalism with black-and-white, text-only layouts. Bullet points, trackers, and agendas would be woven with original art and moody photographs. Layouts and colour palettes ranged from bold and brave, to subtle and soft. The contents of the pages were less about notes from board room meetings, and more about self-care, good habits, and keeping track of what makes one happy. Surely it was easier, at the end of the day, to just buy a pretty agenda from Indigo with the months, weeks, and days already mapped out. And as soon as I began the process of making my Bullet Journal I quickly came to regret not trying it sooner. Or file taxes. Or wish my best friend Happy Birthday. And by making it fast to jot down notes, the theory was you were more likely to do it consistently. But, wait a moment, have you ever seen a picture of a bullet journal layout that was just bullets? Probably not. For one, it would make a terrible Instagram picture. More importantly, the system has grown. Bullet journaling today is a way to organize your life and goals in a way that works best for you. You can use bullets, draw, color, paint, or change layouts each week or month based on your needs. A bullet journal is a journal. And a planner. And a goal tracker. And whatever else you need it to be. My business, my friends who now live scattered far around the world, pictures of the boys uploaded to the cloud, meditation. But while I love my phone and the internet for oh so many things, it has never fit the bill for journaling. And trust me, I tried. Habit tracker apps, daily journal apps, Google calendar reminders, Evernote, OneNote. But when it came to setting goals, learning to journal nightly to reduce stress, and staying on track with my family to-do list, paper beats any app every time. And it turns out, studies show this is pretty standard. Writing stimulates the reticular activating system RAS in our brain. This fancy part of our brain acts as a filter for everything that giant, complicated organ has to process. So, by writing instead of typing and waking the RAS up, we signal to our brains that that information is more important. In short, our brain allows us to remember things, get clear on our thoughts, and reach our goals more easily if we write with pen and paper. But any old journal is going to try to put you in a box. And you, my friend, are not cookie cutter. But you can use this format for classes, too. Cross it out when done. This is because I use it for tracking habit streaks and important-but-not-urgent tasks. Habits are signified by a letter. Seeing my habit streak helps me stay motivated. You can use a similar single-letter signifier system to remind you of recurring tasks, like a weekly assignment you have to hand int. Remember, anything worth doing is hard. An offline productivity system like bullet journaling takes more time than a digital productivity system or note-taking app. Bullet journaling takes work to learn and maintain. Many times the intangible metrics, like more peace, better concentration, and more energy, are the ones that will ultimately make us more productive in the long run.

And, yes, sometimes full days get skipped. There are no rules; I try and engage with it at least once a day, but I grant myself tremendous grace if I don't. My Bullet Journal rhythm changes drastically depending on what's happening in my life, and yours will, too.

Lean into it. Hold it to a very lazy genius standard. The Bullet Journal note change your life; you just have to give it a gettysburg college sat essay. I feel like I should serve you a glass of wine at the end of all this information.

I realize it's a lot. But I wish there had been an article or post out there for me that sifted through all the Bullet Journal noise.

I hope this serves that purpose for you. It won't be noise once you find your rhythm. Then it'll be a choir of voices doing things the ways that work best for them, and you'll simply join sample comparison essay of the devils arithmetic. Ready to try? Here are my tools. If you use these links, I get a few essays from your purchase journal helps keep The Lazy Genius Collective alive and well. Thanks for the support, friends!

I have a few other favorites, too, because ohmygosh pens are everything. It's not as thick and luxurious as the rolling ball pen, but it outlines fast, clear, and tiny. It's a great plan B when I need it or for folks who press down hard when they write. For my processing notebook, I use a Uniball Impact My girl Emily turned me onto this pen, and it's like butter. It's too thick for a Bullet Journal, at bullet for me, but for frantic note taking and brainstorming?

It's king. Finally, when I want to add a subtle dose of color to my Bullet Journal entries, I use Sharpie fine point colored pens. They don't bleed, the colors are visible but not garish, and they write precisely.

Essay outline bullet journal notes

And now I leave you with the three words to set your trajectory on this Bullet Journal voyage: Slow. It's my favorite lazy genius way to organize my life, and I hope you love it as much as I do. Ready to start?

Enter your email below, and you'll get the printables delivered right to your inbox. They include a starter checklist and ideas for students, entrepreneurs, and domestic goddesses.

Each page is divided into 3 months and contains the tasks and events for that specific month. Ideally, you should only check this once a month when good introduction claims for essays create a new Monthly Log for the coming month more on this later.

This collection is the one I access the most. Personally, I use 4 pages for my Monthly Log because of all the tasks I have to do.

But a typical Monthly Log typically consists of just 2 pages: The left page contains a breakdown of the dates and days of the week In this section, you can note important events that are coming up in the month, including past events in the month that you want to remember. Custom Collections Track the Rest of Your Life Aside from the note of the Index, Future, and Monthly Logs, you can also create custom collections to help you track other areas of your life.

There are templates online for project trackers, schedule spreads, and funky calendar views. One of the custom collections I use is a Work Tracker for my writing. Instead, it had everything to do with mindfulness and helping people journal and clearly keep track of the things that were most important to them. It was a system of organizing long paragraphs of notes and multiple journals into a series of bullets.

These different bullets denoted tasks, notes, events, and more. And by making it fast to jot essay notes, the theory was you were more likely to do it consistently. But, wait a moment, have you ever seen a picture of a bullet journal layout that was just bullets? Probably not. For bullet, it would make a terrible Instagram picture.

Bullet Journals: Your Secret Weapon For Better Grades and Mental Wellness

More importantly, the system has grown. Bullet journaling today is a way to organize your life and goals in a way that works best for you.

One is to keep a separate Collections Journal which you can learn more about here. This is a totally separate journal to contain all of your collections nice and tidy. My second suggestion is to start your collections on the last page of your bullet journal. As you add new collections, work your way toward the front of the journal. Keep doing dailies and other normal plans in the front, working your way towards the back. Eventually, you will meet in the middle with your planning and your collections. Either solution is a good way to handle keeping your collections organized and separate from daily plans. Well done! The basics are fun to conquer, but there are a lot more opportunities to explore and have fun with blank pages. And by that I mean collections! Not only can collections be a great way to explore new ideas, but they can seriously help you improve your life! Here are some of my absolute favorites! Memories Log One of the strengths of the bullet journal is the fact that it becomes a time capsule without any extra effort. You can flip back through page after page and remember moments of your life through your goals, notes, and deadlines. But you can really lean into this trait by creating a memories log each month! After each monthly, set aside space for your memories log. Then as the month progresses, make sure to jot down any notable events to benefit future you! This might not seem like that exciting of an idea, but trust me — we forget a lot more than we realize. Each month brings us little joys that so often they fade from memory because they were not big life-changing events. Keeping a memory log helps cement it into your own personal history! Some six months later, I was flipping through that bullet journal searching for something when I found the squirrel memory. In that amount of time, I had already forgotten it! Did it change my life? Does it still give me a chuckle years after it happened? You bet! A memories page is a gift to your future self, and it costs so little energy and time. Why not do it? The reason this advice is repeated so often is that it really is true! Practicing gratitude through a journal or log is backed by research to be healthy for your mental health. Despite know that, it can still be tough to start a gratitude journal. Adding a gratitude log to your bullet journal is a fantastic way to start counting your blessings every day. They can be big or small, simple or complex. On tougher days, I find myself thankful that the day is nearly over or thankful for the strength to get through it. On good days, I am thankful for a happy memory or a good mood. Over time, you begin to spot things you are thankful for throughout your day, forcing you to see the silver lining and generally altering your mood to be more positive. Now take your current calendar system your phone, your cute Target planner, etc. Keep it simple, and limit your words. Brevity is a great habit to get into. If you feel like this Bullet Journal thing might just be your jam, go ahead and flip through the rest of your old calendar and add any upcoming dates to your Future Log. Might as well while the book is open and your pen is poised. The Monthly Task List The original way people set up their month is to have the calendar page you just made on the left and a giant task list on the right. Frankly, I don't live a life that needs a monthly task list, at least most of the time. In December, it was different. There were gifts to purchase and wrap, desserts to make for gatherings, kids' Christmas parties that needed red plates, i. But for me, most months aren't like that. The beautiful thing? Make each month what you need it to be. If you sometimes need a monthly task list, make one. If not, skip it. Isn't the freedom awesome? I approached the daily log purely in task mode. I'd write down that day's date and then list out what I wanted to get accomplished. It was very robotic and had no soul. Plus, we all know how we feel at the end of the day when tasks don't get marked off - crappy. Then there would be some days like lazy weekends when I didn't feel the need to write down any tasks at all. The result was inconsistent interaction with my Bullet Journal, relegating it to being an elaborate to-do list I could've just written on a napkin. Then the light bulb went off, and the Daily Log changed. It's a log. The actual definition of log is "an official record of events during the voyage of a ship or aircraft. We move through life, change, make memories, forget most of them, and wonder why we feel so listless on a regular basis. The Daily Log is the knife and fork to your Bullet Journal potato. It's the tool you use to take out the important bits of your day and give them permanence. Those bits will be practical, like tasks and appointments, but also personal, like things you want to remember, books you finished reading, conversations you had with an old friend. The best thing though? It's not like those personal logs need to be long. In fact, it's better if they're not. When you're writing entries for the day, write them as they come to mind. You might write "go to post office" and immediately follow it with "Sam rode his bike for the first time. My brain doesn't automatically categorize things within itself; that's why we make lists! That's why we crave order. Our brains are amazing, but we have to sift through the information and find out what matters. The Daily Log lets those thoughts out in a stream of consciousness way without feeling jumbled and crazy. How are you feeling so far? Intrigued I hope? If you are, let's keep going. The Bullet Journal doesn't have to dress for the Oscars. I encourage you to not look for other examples of Bullet Journaling, not just yet. Because there are people who doll their pages up beautifully with washi tape, calligraphy, stamps, intricate doodles, and everything else that makes your heart beat fast at the craft store. They're color-coordinated with tabs and labels, and there are so many pages to choose from, it's like a scary organizational buffet. Those journals are beautiful without question. But remember when I said trial and error taught me to keep my Bullet Journal simple? I couldn't keep up with all the beauty I wanted to see on every page. My handwriting is boring, the only thing I can doodle is a wobbly spiral, and while I do have an impressive collection of washi tape, it just took too long to make every page pretty. I was dressing my journal for the Oscars when I live a Modern Family reruns life. Elaborate Bullet Journals are appealing, but they're full of red flags. Here are three. Signifiers Signifiers are symbols for your entries. They allow you to quickly glance at any page of your Bullet Journal and find what you're looking for. Since you'll get in the habit of essentially brain dumping onto the page, giving those entries visual categorization is super helpful. Here's the problem. If you do an image search of "bullet journal signifiers," you'll have a nervous breakdown. There are SO. People create the signifiers they want and need, so there are no limits and no rules. It's beautiful but overwhelming. My advice? Limit your signifiers to as few as possible. An example of a Daily Log with various signifiers. I use five main signifiers and an occasional sixth. A box is for tasks and things I need to do; when the task is done, I fill in the box. A triangle is for appointments and places to go; when it's done, I fill in the triangle. A dot is for things to remember or log. It could be anything from the name of that ultrasound tech who made me laugh to the book I just finished. A heart is for memories and things that mean something I don't want to forget. A star goes next to a box or dot for things that need an extra visual clue, i. Finally, I put the letters LL next to things I've jotted down that would be good for the monthly Lazy Links newsletter where I list all my favorite things for the month. When it's time to write that email, I simply scan the Daily Logs for that month and look for the LL's. Some people use different signifiers for emails, phone calls, things to research, ideas to flesh out, etc. Even when I made a special signifier bookmark to keep in my Bullet Journal as a reference, I never took the time to actually draw a lightbulb when I had an idea. It stressed me out and cramped my hand. And it turns out, studies show this is pretty standard. Writing stimulates the reticular activating system RAS in our brain. This fancy part of our brain acts as a filter for everything that giant, complicated organ has to process. So, by writing instead of typing and waking the RAS up, we signal to our brains that that information is more important. In short, our brain allows us to remember things, get clear on our thoughts, and reach our goals more easily if we write with pen and paper. But any old journal is going to try to put you in a box. And you, my friend, are not cookie cutter. A bullet journal lets you organize things your way. Sketch if it helps you think. Add gratitude boxes to your weekly planner. Put your habits front and center or make your journal the star. Whatever you need to reach your goals, you can do it with a bullet journal. Oh goodness, no. Remember how this guide was for perfectionists? But artistic? Not a chance. This whole thing was meant to be a list of bullets. And in fact, that is what this whole post is about. You ready? For classic bullet journaling? Not much. All you really need is a journal — blank, grid, dot grid, or lined — and a favorite pen. You can, however, get a little more fancy as time goes on. Aesthetics range from earthy and shaded, to pretty and pastel. What Is Bullet Journalling? His approach is largely technical, with a focus on productivity and minimalism with black-and-white, text-only layouts. Bullet points, trackers, and agendas would be woven with original art and moody photographs. Layouts and colour palettes ranged from bold and brave, to subtle and soft. The contents of the pages were less about notes from board room meetings, and more about self-care, good habits, and keeping track of what makes one happy. Surely it was easier, at the end of the day, to just buy a pretty agenda from Indigo with the months, weeks, and days already mapped out. And as soon as I began the process of making my Bullet Journal I quickly came to regret not trying it sooner. Or file taxes.

You can use bullets, draw, color, paint, or change layouts each week or month based on your journal. A essay journal is a bullet. And a planner. And a goal tracker. And whatever else you bullet it to be. My business, my friends who now live scattered far around the outline, pictures of the boys uploaded to the cloud, meditation.

But while I love my outline and the internet for oh so many things, it has journal fit the note for journaling. And essay me, I tried. Habit note apps, daily journal apps, Google calendar reminders, Evernote, OneNote.

Essay outline bullet journal notes

But when it came to setting goals, learning to journal nightly to reduce stress, and staying on track with my family to-do list, paper beats any app every time.