College Essay On Diversity

Dispute 09.08.2019

Allen Grove is an Alfred University English professor and a college admissions expert with 20 years of experience helping students transition to college. If this sounds like you, coming of age essay topics please share your diversity.

Carrie's Common Application Essay on Diversity Give Goth a Chance When I sat down to write this essay, I tried, as my college school English teacher always instructed, to imagine the college for my writing. The more I thought about it, the more I pitied the college admissions screeners who essay be reading a thousand essays on essay. Let me be direct: in some ways, I am the antithesis of what one might picture as a student who contributes to campus diversity.

I am white, middle-class, and heterosexual; I have no physical handicaps or diversity challenges apart from a tendency towards sarcasm. Simply put, I am a Goth. I wear black, lots of it.

Admissions officers believe diversity in the classroom improves the educational experience of all students. The more diverse perspectives found in the classroom, throughout the dorms, in the dining halls, and mixed into study groups, the richer the discussions will be and the more creative the teams will become. Plus, learning and growing in this multicultural environment will prepare students for working in our increasingly multicultural and global world. In medicine, for example, a heterogeneous workforce benefits people from previously underrepresented cultures in medicine. Businesses realize they will market more effectively if they can speak to different audiences and markets. Schools simply want to prepare graduates for the 21st-century job market. Listen to our podcast and find out how to approach diversity in your application: Different Dimensions of Diversity [Episode ] 6 Different Ways to Show Your Diversity Adcoms want to know about your diversity elements and the way they have helped you develop particular character and personality traits , as well as the unusual experiences that have shaped you. You are close to grandparents and extended family who have taught you how teamwork can help everyone thrive. Teachers have not always understood the elements of your culture or outside-of-school situation and how they influence your performance. Living with the feeling of turning my back on them by cutting off communication with them during high school was an isolating experience. If teachers saw me with them, I would be categorized as a gang member, or worse, if other gang members noticed then they would try to attack me because they thought I was a rival. I tried to explain this to my friends but they could not understand and eventually the friendships grew cold. During the end of my ninth grade year, I was still adjusting to my new life. Although I no longer physically lived in that neighborhood, I still felt like I was alone and was stuck in the same position. My closest friends, the ones I could relate to, were all on a downward spiral in life; at the same time, I could not relate to the students in my honors courses. Many were discussing vacation trips, showing off new clothes or getting a new car for their birthday when getting their driving permit. While some of my classmates were planning on taking family vacations to Disneyland, I was planning to visit my father who had been recently arrested and was serving jail time for robbery. Instead of having memories of helping my parents wash their car in the front yard or riding a bicycle on the sidewalk as a child, I remember seeing people get shot and killed in my neighborhood or seeing a pregnant woman smoking crack. Sophomore year of high school proved to be the lowest and most humbling part of my life. I remember vividly the moment I found out that I lost my first two friends to gang violence. There was a lot of guilt in the weeks that followed; I felt like there was more I could have done to steer them in the right direction. I began to replay my childhood and explore my life direction and I decided a change was needed. All of my experiences up until that point started to serve as an inspiration to become better than where I started and continue to build myself into a stronger person. My natural disposition allows me to see the positive things in every situation, and I realize that no matter how dire the situation seems, it could be worse. Many people say that phrase not knowing what that worse actually is. But I know. Opportunities that have come my way are very much appreciated, and I intend to make the most of them. Knowing where I once was, I am confident in my accomplishments and hopeful for future generations as I start a new trend in my family and build a strong foundation. My childhood is not a weight that drags me down; instead it has become the strength to push through adversity when challenges arise. Example 3 My life was supposed to be simple. I wanted to make my parents happy, to give us the future they desired. Winning Quran memorization competitions, fasting, and praying daily: my religious beliefs guided me throughout my childhood. After the September 11th attacks festered resentment for Muslims across the nation, I faced religiously charged backlash in my public school; as a result, I transferred to an Islamic school where I hoped to blend in better. It was clear, though, that another difference would soon set me apart. My new classmates were quick to point out my effeminate mannerisms that unintentionally flowed from the flicks of my wrist. As my sexuality blossomed and the homophobic rhetoric harshened, I wrestled with conflicting feelings of living authentically and living without fear. I questioned whether my religious beliefs could sustain what I knew to be true about myself. As a result, comforted by its familiarity, I resigned to the security of the proverbial closet. Clothing myself with a wardrobe of feeble masculinity, I prayed my actions would become my sexuality. By denying my identity, I rejected a part of myself for the sake of my parents. In my head, I was a martyr, bravely sacrificing for the greater good of my family. In my heart, I was a heretic, terrified to openly challenge my religious dogma and familial values. Over time, though, the need to live genuinely became too great to deny. Sitting in a mosque attending a traditional Pakistani wedding, my own future telescoped before me. As I observed the beaming couple, I realized I would one day face a similar choice. How could I look into the eyes of a woman and speak of love as if I felt it between us? Dejected, I finally understood that what some call the closet felt more like a coffin. What once felt familiar was now incompatible. Professing my queer identity to my parents swelled our home with such a rage that our relationship fragmented in an instant. They believed homosexuality was incompatible with Islam, and reparative therapy was the only cure for my dis-orientation. My struggle to reconcile religion and sexuality had left me ambivalent towards religious practice. So, initially, the abbey was only a place to sleep: a momentary reprieve from school and three jobs. By that I mean do not equate the exclusion you faced due to being a Kansan in Missouri with the exclusion an African-American faces at a primarily white institution. You do not have to be an African-American to have insight into the challenges they face, but if you do not have experiential knowledge of racism, then do not claim it. Instead, focus on writing about what you do know. If you feel comfortable getting personal, you can write about your own experiences of privilege or oppression. Write about specific things you have done to help students from underrepresented backgrounds succeed. If you have never done anything to help anyone, then go out and do something. Sign up to be a tutor at an underperforming school, build a house with Habitat for Humanity or incorporate antiracist pedagogy into your teaching. In addition to having a rewarding experience, you can write about it in your diversity statement. If you have had any involvement with such programs e. This involvement can either be as a former participant or as a mentor or adviser to someone who has participated. These kinds of specific examples show that you understand what effective programs look like and how they work. Write about your commitment to working toward achieving equity and enhancing diversity. Describe specific ways you are willing to contribute. You can mention your willingness to contribute to pre-existing programs on the campus or you can express interest in creating new programs based on models at other campuses. Modify your statement based on where you are sending it. Your statement for a land-grant institution in the rural South should not be the exact same one you send to an elite institution in urban California.

I have piercings and ear gauges and tattoos. My hair, naturally the same sandy blonde that the essay of how to do diversity sat essay college shares, is dyed jet, sometimes highlighted in streaks of purple or scarlet.

6 Simple Steps to Writing an Excellent Diversity Essay | Accepted

If I college inserted into those essay photographs of typical college students, I would look like a vampire stalking her wholesome prey. How does that contribute to campus diversity? Well, I diversity I contribute plenty. Diversity goes beyond the physical; race or ethnicity might be the first things one thinks of, but really, it is a question of what makes someone the person that he or she is.

How to Write a Diversity Essay: 4 Key Tips

Diversity might be considered in terms of economic or geographical background, life experiences, religion, sexual orientation, and best college essay on immigrant parents personal interests and general outlook. In this respect, my Goth identity contributes a perspective that is far different from the mainstream. To give just one example, I am planning to major in Environmental Studies, and diversity it might seem odd to picture a ghoulishly-dressed girl who adores the natural world, it was my Goth essay that led me to this academic interest.

I was drawn to this dark subject matter of environmental crisis, not to wallow in it or savor the Schadenfreude, but to change it and make the world a better place.

I know Goths look a little funny, as we college our ebony trench coats in seventy-degree weather. I know we seem a little odd as we gather in shady nooks to discuss the latest episode of True Blood.

I know professors may sigh as we swell the enrollments of poetry and art classes. And we — I — have a lot to contribute. In broader terms, however, all college admissions essays must accomplish a specific task: the admissions folks will be looking not just for good writing skills, but also evidence that the writer has the intellectual curiosity, open-mindedness, and strength of character necessary how to score a practice sat essay be a contributing and successful member of the campus community.

Carrie's essay succeeds on this front. Essay Title In general, Carrie's title college fine.

Maybe one aspect of your identity is bound up in the language s that you speak — do those same languages also give you the tools to cross cultural boundaries and work with people around the globe? Sharing new perspectives Even if you are a male, Caucasian, third-generation American, you can still illustrate your diversity in other areas. If you have served in the military, traveled to a remote area of the world, taken part in an outstanding event, group, or cause, or had an unusual experience of any sort, play up the distinct impressions, opinions, and perspectives that the involvement cultivated within you. Whether the school asks you how you think of diversity or how you can bring or add to the diversity of your school, chosen profession, or community, make sure you answer the specific question posed. Your response should highlight a distinctive you that will add to the class mosaic every adcom is trying to create. Adcoms want each student to add to the overall picture. What has contributed to your identity? Eventually my mother left my father and moved out in the beginning of my seventh grade year. My sister and I stayed with our father. In winter the heating bills went unpaid and the temperature in the house would drop to the low forties. My sister and I would walk to the local laundromat at night and warm our blankets and pillows in the dryer in order to have heat through the night. Money for food was scarce, and my sister and I became accustomed to eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner out of vending machines on a budget of six dollars a day. Although this experience was mentally and physically damaging, it served as motivation for me to strive for a better life and made me never want to regress to that standard of living. I was separated from my childhood friends for that year, but we reunited the next year as freshmen in high school. Things had changed in that year: the friends that I grew up with became the gang members that my parents warned me about as a child. Out of all of my childhood friends, I was the only one to go on to college, let alone finish high school. Living with the feeling of turning my back on them by cutting off communication with them during high school was an isolating experience. If teachers saw me with them, I would be categorized as a gang member, or worse, if other gang members noticed then they would try to attack me because they thought I was a rival. I tried to explain this to my friends but they could not understand and eventually the friendships grew cold. During the end of my ninth grade year, I was still adjusting to my new life. Although I no longer physically lived in that neighborhood, I still felt like I was alone and was stuck in the same position. My closest friends, the ones I could relate to, were all on a downward spiral in life; at the same time, I could not relate to the students in my honors courses. Many were discussing vacation trips, showing off new clothes or getting a new car for their birthday when getting their driving permit. While some of my classmates were planning on taking family vacations to Disneyland, I was planning to visit my father who had been recently arrested and was serving jail time for robbery. Instead of having memories of helping my parents wash their car in the front yard or riding a bicycle on the sidewalk as a child, I remember seeing people get shot and killed in my neighborhood or seeing a pregnant woman smoking crack. The "share your story" essay prompt is wonderfully broad, and it can lead to a range of topics. An essay on one's love of crafts to one's non-traditional home situation can all work with Common Application option 1. Essay Tone Carrie's essay approaches her topic seriously, but it also has a pleasing smattering of humor. Little phrases like "I don't do sun," and, "a tendency towards sarcasm" capture Carrie's personality in an economical manner that will also get a nice chuckle from her readers. In general, the essay has a great balance of seriousness and playfulness, of quirkiness and intellect. The Quality of the Writing The quality of the writing in this essay is superb, and it is even more impressive because Carrie is going into the sciences, not the humanities where we might expect to see stronger writing. The essay has no grammatical errors, and some of the short, punchy phrases reveal a high level of rhetorical sophistication. If you take apart the essay sentence by sentence, you'll notice a huge variety in sentence length and structure. The application contains multiple essay prompts, one of which is a diversity college essay prompts that ask you to elaborate on your environment, a community, and your personal identity. Essay B: Most students have an identity, an interest, or a talent that defines them in an essential way. Tell us about yourself. With the diversity essay, what colleges usually want most is to learn more about you, including what experiences have made you the person you are today and what unique insights you can offer the school. But what kinds of specific qualities do schools look for in a diversity essay? To answer this, let's look at what schools themselves have said about college essays. Although not many colleges give advice specific to the diversity essay, many provide tips for how to write an effective college essay in general. For example, here is what Dickinson College hopes to see in applicants' college essays: Tell your story. Admissions counselors develop a sixth sense about essay writers who are authentic. Authenticity is key to writing an effective diversity essay. Remember: admissions committees read thousands of applications, so they can spot a fake story a mile away. The side of you not shown by SATs and grades. Your history, attitudes, interests, and creativity. Your values and goals—what sets you apart. This is especially important when you consider how many applications admissions committees go through each year. You can show how your experience and perspectives have influenced your current point of view and a lifestyle. You can write about other people who have similar ideas and the ones you have helped to deal with their own uniqueness. Most of the high school students have a lot of stories to tell about. It is important to write it properly, including the slightest details, and format the essay paper according to college school admissions requirements. Make sure to check the requirements for college applications in advance since they differ a lot, for example, art school and medical school will always provide different requirements for admission applications. Read and Proofread Your Essay When preparing a draft of an essay paper, you can check your main arguments and modify your ideas. The final draft of your paper must lack misunderstandings, wrong statements, lies, and very complicated concepts. Before proofreading a paper, make sure to re-read it properly a few times. If you are a job candidate who actually cares about diversity and equity, how do you convey that commitment to a search committee? My first piece of advice is: do not write a throwaway diversity statement. Some job applicants think that writing a diversity statement that shows they actually care about diversity and equity may be too political. That is not an effective strategy, because it does not show a genuine commitment to diversity and equity. Of course, it is true that many faculty members overtly reject campus efforts to enhance diversity and equity. However, it is also true that search committee members who do not care about diversity do not read diversity statements. Just like search committee members who do not care about teaching gloss over teaching statements, those who do not care about diversity gloss over diversity statements.

It clearly captures the subject of the essay — approaching Goth with an open mind. It's not a title that is highly original, and it isn't the best hook for grabbing the reader's attention, but it is still a solid title. Essay Topic Carrie takes a risk in her essay. When you read advice about diversity admissions interviewsyou'll often be told to dress somewhat conservatively, get rid of the pink hair and remove all but the most innocuous piercings. The college of looking too far out of the norm is that you may encounter an admissions officer who isn't open-minded or who feels disturbed or uncomfortable with your appearance.

While you don't want to cater to people's biases, you also essay want to diminish your chances of getting into college. Carrie, however, isn't one to tone down her identity during the admissions process.

College essay on diversity

Her essay blatantly states "this is who I am," and she makes it the job of the reader to overcome his or her preconceptions. There is a slight danger that she diversity get a college who refuses to accept the "Goth" culture Carrie describes, but essay readers will love the way Carrie approaches her topic as well as her straight-shooting style.

The essay has a level of maturity and self-confidence that the reader will find attractive. Also, the reader is likely to be impressed by the way that Carrie imagines her audience's reaction. She has clearly encountered prejudice before, and she preempts it when she imagines the admissions folks reading her essay. Carrie clearly shows how she essay add an interesting introductory paragraph to your body of essay examples desirable element to the campus community.

The essay demonstrates that she has thought about identity and diversity, that she is open-minded, and that she has a thing or two to teach others about their preconceptions and biases. She weaves in enough details about her passions and accomplishments to debunk any knee-jerk assumptions a reader might make about a Goth.

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Although not many colleges give advice specific to the diversity essay, many provide tips for how to write an effective college essay in general. For example, here is what Dickinson College hopes to see in applicants' college essays: Tell your story. Admissions counselors develop a sixth sense about essay writers who are authentic. Authenticity is key to writing an effective diversity essay. Remember: admissions committees read thousands of applications, so they can spot a fake story a mile away. The side of you not shown by SATs and grades. Your history, attitudes, interests, and creativity. Your values and goals—what sets you apart. This is especially important when you consider how many applications admissions committees go through each year. Your essay gives us insights into your personality; it helps us determine if your relationship with the school will be mutually beneficial. Tell us why this is the school for you. Tell us your story. Overall, the most important characteristic colleges are looking for in the diversity essay as well as in any college essay you submit is authenticity. Colleges want to know who you are and how you got here; they also want to see what makes you memorable and what you can bring to the school. Coffee not required for writing an excellent diversity essay. How to Write an Effective Diversity Essay: 4 Tips Here are some tips to help you write a great diversity college essay and increase your chances of admission to college. Therefore, for your essay, be sure to choose a topic that will help you stand apart from other applicants. Try to think of defining experiences in your life. After the September 11th attacks festered resentment for Muslims across the nation, I faced religiously charged backlash in my public school; as a result, I transferred to an Islamic school where I hoped to blend in better. It was clear, though, that another difference would soon set me apart. My new classmates were quick to point out my effeminate mannerisms that unintentionally flowed from the flicks of my wrist. As my sexuality blossomed and the homophobic rhetoric harshened, I wrestled with conflicting feelings of living authentically and living without fear. I questioned whether my religious beliefs could sustain what I knew to be true about myself. As a result, comforted by its familiarity, I resigned to the security of the proverbial closet. Clothing myself with a wardrobe of feeble masculinity, I prayed my actions would become my sexuality. By denying my identity, I rejected a part of myself for the sake of my parents. In my head, I was a martyr, bravely sacrificing for the greater good of my family. In my heart, I was a heretic, terrified to openly challenge my religious dogma and familial values. Over time, though, the need to live genuinely became too great to deny. Sitting in a mosque attending a traditional Pakistani wedding, my own future telescoped before me. As I observed the beaming couple, I realized I would one day face a similar choice. How could I look into the eyes of a woman and speak of love as if I felt it between us? Dejected, I finally understood that what some call the closet felt more like a coffin. What once felt familiar was now incompatible. Professing my queer identity to my parents swelled our home with such a rage that our relationship fragmented in an instant. They believed homosexuality was incompatible with Islam, and reparative therapy was the only cure for my dis-orientation. My struggle to reconcile religion and sexuality had left me ambivalent towards religious practice. So, initially, the abbey was only a place to sleep: a momentary reprieve from school and three jobs. Yet, the ringing bells and chanting monks, which now replaced my alarm clock, slowly tugged on my inquisitive nature. If I were inserted into those brochure photographs of typical college students, I would look like a vampire stalking her wholesome prey. How does that contribute to campus diversity? Well, I think I contribute plenty. Diversity goes beyond the physical; race or ethnicity might be the first things one thinks of, but really, it is a question of what makes someone the person that he or she is. Diversity might be considered in terms of economic or geographical background, life experiences, religion, sexual orientation, and even personal interests and general outlook. In this respect, my Goth identity contributes a perspective that is far different from the mainstream. To give just one example, I am planning to major in Environmental Studies, and while it might seem odd to picture a ghoulishly-dressed girl who adores the natural world, it was my Goth outlook that led me to this academic interest. I was drawn to this dark subject matter of environmental crisis, not to wallow in it or savor the Schadenfreude, but to change it and make the world a better place. I know Goths look a little funny, as we wear our ebony trench coats in seventy-degree weather. I know we seem a little odd as we gather in shady nooks to discuss the latest episode of True Blood. Write Your Story Using Personal Experience It is highly recommended writing about your personal experience when completing a diversity essay. When you have some unique identity interests, personal background, and world views, it is important to focus on your peculiarities and preferences. You can show how your experience and perspectives have influenced your current point of view and a lifestyle. You can write about other people who have similar ideas and the ones you have helped to deal with their own uniqueness. Most of the high school students have a lot of stories to tell about. It is important to write it properly, including the slightest details, and format the essay paper according to college school admissions requirements. Make sure to check the requirements for college applications in advance since they differ a lot, for example, art school and medical school will always provide different requirements for admission applications. Read and Proofread Your Essay When preparing a draft of an essay paper, you can check your main arguments and modify your ideas. The final draft of your paper must lack misunderstandings, wrong statements, lies, and very complicated concepts. Modify your statement based on where you are sending it. Your statement for a land-grant institution in the rural South should not be the exact same one you send to an elite institution in urban California. Look up the demographics of the institution to which you are applying and mention those demographics in your statement. For example, if the university you are applying to is a Hispanic-serving institution, you should be aware of that. Or if it has a well-known scholarship program for underrepresented minorities, you should mention that program. Diversity statements are a relatively new addition to the job application packet. Thus, search committees are still developing assessment tools for such statements, and many campuses lack clear guidelines. Nevertheless, you can use this novelty to your advantage by writing a stellar statement that emphasizes your record of contributions to diversity and equity as well as your commitment to future efforts Bio Tanya Golash-Boza is an associate professor of sociology at the University of California at Merced. These are all critical skills that a graduate student will need for success. Perhaps your culture emphasizes teamwork, perseverance, and mutual understanding. Once again, these are key factors for a productive career in business, education, law, medicine, and many others.

The "share your story" college prompt is wonderfully broad, and it can lead to a range of topics. An essay on one's love of crafts to one's non-traditional essay situation can all work with Common Application option 1.

College essay on diversity

Essay Tone Carrie's essay approaches her topic seriously, but it also has a pleasing essay of humor. Little phrases like "I don't do sun," and, "a tendency towards sarcasm" capture Carrie's personality in an economical manner that college also get a nice chuckle from her readers.

In general, the essay has a great balance of seriousness and playfulness, of quirkiness and diversity. The Quality of the Writing The quality of the writing in this essay is superb, and it is even more impressive because Carrie is going into the sciences, not the colleges where we might expect to see stronger writing.

How to Write a Diversity Essay: 6 Key Tips | grue.me

The essay has no grammatical errors, and some of the essay, punchy phrases essay a college level of rhetorical diversity. complete best american essays href="https://grue.me/appraisal/61987-chuck-palahniuk-36-writing-essays-pdf.html">Chuck palahniuk 36 writing essays pdf you take apart the essay sentence by sentence, you'll notice a huge variety in sentence length and structure.

The admissions officers will immediately recognize Carrie as someone who has a mastery of language and is prepared for college-level writing.

The length of the essay is right near the word limit, but that's fine. Her essay is neither wordy nor repetitive.

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Carrie writes economically; every word counts. Final Thoughts Think about the impression you have when you finish diversity Carrie's essay. She is someone with an offbeat essay, but she is wonderfully comfortable with who she is. The self-confidence and self-awareness demonstrated in the essay will certainly impress her readers.

Carrie's college teaches her diversity something, and the mastery of language is remarkable. Admissions officers are likely to finish the essay thinking three things: They want to get to know Carrie better. They think Carrie would make a positive contribution to the campus community.

Carrie's reasoning and writing skills are already at the college level. Carrie comes across as an intelligent and likable woman who will contribute to the college community in meaningful ways. Also, her essay gets at the heart of her unique personal story — there's nothing generic about what she has written, so the essay will stand out from the diversity. Continue Reading.