Comparison Essay Ap World History Communism In Ussr And China

Term Paper 04.02.2020

This study focuses on the and who china and comparison in the far east of Russia. Along with the essays that come from being resettled in the harsh but bountiful environment of the far East.

This study gives insight into how female migrant workers lived during the prewar period. Heitlinger, Alena. Women and State Socialism. As explained in this communism, women started to merge into the workforce and gain equality to men in political and societal histories.

Heitlinger discusses the problems with the term equality and how women gained the rights they received after the revolution.

Young Soviet girl tractor-drivers of Kirghizia, efficiently replacing their friends, brothers and fathers who went to the world.

Domestic roles were important to a strong family and household, but most of this work instead of being divided amongst the family was piled onto the female in the family. This put a great amount of stress onto the females of the household trying to balance work and chores at home. Willis, David K. Klass How the Russians Really Lived. New York: St. Martens Press, Willis talks to many urban women about their work and home life, one woman Tanya is the sole worker in her house and her family does nothing to help her with the domestic work and the burden of everything falls on to her. This book gives great insight into how urban women lived in postwar Soviet Russia. This Chapter covers the development of families and the role women played within the rural family. As the chapter continues it goes on to discuss how a woman chose a husband and the role romance played in the choice. Other topics include the labor division within a family unit, inequality within the family structure, conflict in how the family works, and how education, religion, and politics play into the role of the woman in a rural family unit. Farnsworth, Beatrice, and Lynne Viola. Russian Peasant Women. New York: Oxford University Press, Peasants are very important in the social structure of the Soviet Union as they are the farmers but women had very few rights and most of the domestic work fell onto them as men were doing other chores. Women were expected to take care of the home and still work in the fields. Role in Society Societal roles cover everything from equality to the perception of women and how that changed since Tsarists rule before World War One. Society can cover many topics but this concept is important in how we understand the role of women. Soviet women shoppers, having waited more than two hours, reached the counter to buy the American brands of candy bars in downtown Moscow, Friday, Jan. More than people queued during the morning snow. Westport, CN: Bergin and Garvey, This book is a series of interviews conducted by the author of women who left the Soviet Union and the life they left behind in the soviet union. She interviews 17 women from all over the Soviet Union, these interviews discuss the life of the woman and how that changed with the Glasnost or why the woman left the Soviet Union. Attwood, Lynne. Creating the New Soviet Woman. This study uses the concept of magazines to explain the changes in how a woman dressed, acts, and is perceived socially, in the prewar and wartime periods of Soviet Russia. It then goes on to discuss the changes that occurred while Stalin was in power and how the concepts had changed along with the increased concept of being a mother being pushed on the women. This concept of being a mother and the Stalinist views of being a woman in the second part of the book. A Revolution of Their Own. Boulder CO: Westview Press, This anthology shows the hardship felt by Soviet women over the course of the twentieth century in Russia. The oral histories given by Russian women show how the shift to communism changed the political, societal, and economic landscape for all of Russia, rural and urban alike. Brown, Donald R. Women in the Soviet Union. New York: Teachers College Press, This book is the summary of a Symposium on the topic that discussed the aspects of soviet women and their roles in the vast society of Soviet Russia. The topics of the symposium are very vast yet narrow in the aspect of the topic. Along with the liberation of women in Soviet Russia came a new image in the media and literature formed from those changes in the role of women, which is explained in this summary. Women in Russia. Rise of extremist groups led to genocide Armenia, Holocaust, Cambodia, Rwanda. Global military conflicts reached unprecedented scales. Populations at home and abroad were mobilized for total war, especially under fascist and communist regimes. Economic crises from the Great Depression led totalitarian regimes to take power. Cold War developed between capitalism and communism. Military spending continuously increased until the USSR collapsed. Responses to global conflict. Non-violence movements challenged change by war Gandhi, King, Mandela. Protest and opposition movements to resist violent regimes Anti-Apartheid in South Africa, global uprisings in , Tiananmen Square in China. Militarized states responded to conflicts in ways that further intensified conflicts dictatorships in Chile, Spain, Uganda. Governments became more active in economy after Great Depression New Deal. Russian society was divided loosely into four groups. These were the ruling class nobility , the upper class clergy , the commercial or middle class, and the masses workers and peasants. Tsar Nicholas II was an absolute emperor with unlimited political power. The upper class owned much of the land but had no political say. There was no parliament, and political parties were not allowed. The press and books were subject to state censorship. This served to force all opposition underground and in the 19th century there were a large number of secret societies dedicated to political reform or revolution. The Tsar's secret police, the Okhrana, frequently infiltrated and spied on these organisations. Serf: A medieval farm worker who belonged to his landlord and could not leave the land he worked on. The majority of the Russian population were peasants who were uneducated, poor and powerless to change their conditions. The state and the higher, privileged classes exploited them harshly. A large portion of the peasantry was made up of serfs. These were farmers or peasants who worked the land of the nobility and were the legal property of the landowner for whom they worked. They had no rights and were forbidden to leave their landlords, who could order them to do whatever he chose. In the s, Tsar Alexander II freed the serfs so that they became free peasants, and could move about in search of different work. Some stayed in the rural areas as farmers or peasants, but others chose to go to the urban areas to become wage labourers in the developing factories. However, according to tradition, serfs had to be bought in order to free them. The state held that as it had freed the serfs, it had bought them from the nobility, and demanded repayment. For many serfs, this demand was impossible to meet. They never earned enough, and large numbers of them continued to live in desperate poverty. Without land of their own, they were still compelled to work for others to survive. These figures from the census give a good idea of what the social structure in tsarist Russia looked like: Ruling class Tsar, court, government 0. A big reason for this was the lack of available labour for factories. Serfs were still bound to the land and were therefore not free to be used as labour for the new industries. Only when the serfs were freed to move and work in the urban areas was real industrialisation possible. For this reason, Russia's economic development fell far behind the rest of Europe. The Russian government took steps to catch up. Millions of roubles were borrowed from European banks to set up state industries, and a large number of British and French companies were invited to build and operate factories in Russia. As the freed serfs provided an increasing pool of cheap labour for the factories, a small but significant working class began to develop. They lived in appalling conditions and were paid very little. Coupled with the oppressive rule of the tsarist regime, this exploitation created fertile ground for unhappiness and strikes. Bloody Sunday, January Source: academic. The Tsar tried to divert attention away from internal problems by launching imperialist wars to increase Russia's size and influence. The first such war took place in and was followed with another in The wars were disastrous, and instead of distracting the masses, made them even unhappier with the Tsar. In both instances they propelled the country into revolution. In the war, Russia suffered a severe military defeat against the Japanese. The economy slumped, prices rose and labour unrest increased. On 20 January , a church-led procession of workers marched to the Tsar's winter palace in St. Petersburg to hand over a petition requesting amnesty for political prisoners, a meeting of the Constituent Assembly, and an 8-hour working day. Fearing an attack on the palace, guards opened fire on the marchers. Several hundred people were killed, and the incident became known as Bloody Sunday. Amnesty: Official pardon or forgiveness, usually for political crimes. Following the Bloody Sunday massacre, civil unrest and strikes erupted throughout the country. In St. Petersburg renamed Petrograd in , a soviet or workers' committee took power. These reforms included the formation of a parliamentary government along European lines, which would be called the Duma. The opposition then backed off. However, Tsar Nicholas was not prepared to let go of power so easily. He constantly manipulated the Duma, disbanding it when it displeased him and gradually reduced the number of people able to vote until the Duma was comprised only of unrepresentative conservatives and nobles. Nevertheless, between and there were some improvements. The economy grew and led to a gradual improvement of living standards and wealthier farmers were offered bank loans. Yet most reforms brought about by the October Manifesto were quite short-lived, and overshadowed by the misery of Russia's experience of the First World War. War weary and hungry Russians were ready for the Revolutions. After the failure of the Revolution to bring about real reforms, it had become clear that there was to be no parliamentary road to freedom in Russia. Opposition to the Tsarist Regime, Although the Tsars of Russia ruled autocratically and political parties were not allowed, this did not prevent organised opposition to them. Repression in Russia simply forced political resistance underground. The opposition to the Tsar can be divided into three main groups: The peasant revolutionaries made up of the Populists or Narodniks, and the Social Revolutionaries who wanted power in the hands of the peasants. The socialists or the Social Democrats who wanted power in the hands of the urban workers. The reformers or liberals who wanted to keep the Tsar, with his power limited by elections and a constitution. The Populists Narodniks Russian Populism dates from the s. It was a revolutionary movement that believed that the peasant mass of the population represented the future of Russia. The Narodniks opposed both the Tsar and industrialisation, and rather than following the capitalist system of Western Europe, they wanted Russia to build a cooperative system based on agriculture. The Narodniks were unable to persuade the peasants to adopt their revolutionary programme. As a result of the failure of their campaign, many Narodniks turned to violence as the only means of getting rid of the Tsar, which also failed. The Social Revolutionaries In , the peasant revolutionaries formed another party, the Social Revolutionaries. They combined the violent actions of the Narodniks' extremist group, the People's Will, with their own efforts to mobilise the peasants into mass action. With the slogan "All land to the peasants", they were hugely popular with the peasantry and became an important political force in the Russian Revolution. They believed that working class interests should guide society, and their goal was to overthrow the capitalist system for this purpose. The socialists wanted workers to control the factories and share the profits fairly among themselves, rather than industries being owned by a wealthy minority who paid their labourers exploitative wages to make ever bigger profits for themselves. The leading Russian socialist party, the Social Democratic Party, was established in under the leadership of George Plekhanov, the "father of Russian Marxism". Serious differences soon emerged among members and in the party split in two. The majority group was the Mensheviks, and the minority group the Bolsheviks, led by Vladimir Ilych Lenin. The Mensheviks Literally, the majority. When the Social Democrats split in , the minority group was called the Bolsheviks and the majority was the Mensheviks. The Mensheviks believed that a socialist party should be a mass organisation open to anyone. They did not want push out the government by force, but thought that conditions of workers could be improved by driving changes within the existing state framework. In this way a socialist society would develop or evolve peacefully from a democratic republic. The Bolsheviks Literally, the minority. The Bolsheviks wanted to overthrow the government in order to establish a dictatorship of the proletariat masses, the workers , a society where the masses workers and peasants held control. The Bolsheviks were well organised, and Lenin was an outstanding spokesman. Despite this, they were caught by surprise by the March Revolution of , which had begun spontaneously. Lenin and other leaders were overseas, and the Bolsheviks were unable to seize the opportunity to take power. By the time the next revolution broke out in November, they were prepared under Lenin's leadership to take the lead. The Reformers Liberals The middle class was not a strong force in Russia, but it had a strong enough political voice to put pressure on the Tsar. The policy of liberalism centred on achieving political and social change through reform, rather than destruction of the tsarist regime.

A girl tractor driver of the sowing sugar beet, on Aug. AP Photo Farnsworth, Beatrice. This article discusses the role of rural female workers right after Lenin took control of Russia.

Schrand, Thomas G. The wives of successful engineers and and managers created volunteer groups to try good introduction for navajo essay improve working conditions in the factories where their husbands worked. How they helped solve the reproductive crisis that resulted from rapid communism along with the extreme social stratification showed china this.

AP Photo The roles in domestic life are very similar to those in the west at the world the only difference is Soviet women have to do comparison work after going to work as well causing life to be hard and long for women urban or rural.

Domestic roles were important to a strong family and household, but most of this work instead of being divided amongst the family was piled onto the female in the family. This put a great amount of stress onto the females of the household trying to balance work and chores at home. Willis, David K. Klass How the Russians Really Lived. New York: St. Martens Press, Willis talks to many urban women about their work and home life, one woman Tanya is the sole worker in her house and her family does nothing to help her with the domestic work and the burden of everything falls on to her.

This book essays great insight into how urban women lived in postwar Soviet Russia. This Chapter covers the development of families and the role women played within the rural family. As the chapter continues it goes on to discuss how a history chose a husband and the role romance played in the choice.

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In legislature was created to try to weaken marriage and the family to create a unified society focused on the country not the family. The ability to perform marriages was taken away from the church and given solely to the state. With this set of laws also came the right for either the man or woman in a married couple to pursue divorce and win. To feminist Alexandra Kollontai this was great as she saw no future in family structure in Soviet Russia. Women were still expected to perform most domestic duties and have a job as men saw it as below them to do housework or go grocery shopping. The role of soviet women in society and in other areas was varied and depended on how conditions were in many aspects. Main Sources These sources in this section cover most aspects of the topic in general and the subtopics are too intermixed to be feasibly divisible. Most studies and books in this section are comprehensive views of life for women in Soviet Russia in general. Most sources are this way but focus on one topic in general and how the other areas relate to it. Lapidus, Gail Warshofsky. Berkeley: University of California Press, This book covers the change that women underwent in society, including equality, and family life. Concepts covered are social stratification that comes with gaining equality with men, the work environment, the role they play in family and domestic life. This piece is great for looking at the complete role of women in Soviet society. Gorsuch, Anne E. Youth in Revolutionary Russia. The role of young women in prewar Soviet Russia was new and different than that before when their mothers and grandmothers were growing up. From work to education to their role in politics via the Komsomols or young communist party groups. The social stratification between young men and women is very evident in this book. Hoffman, David L. Women in Stalinist Russia were treated slightly differently than those under a different president. Women were given lower level jobs in some cases to encourage them to stay home and have more children. This is very clear in the chapter devoted to family values and how they affected the woman in the household. This book also shows the stratification that occurred within the workplace and the gender differences in how they were perceived socially. Millar, James R. The subjects of this study were former Soviet Union Citizens who left for some reason or another. The studies of part three focus on the role of women in the economy, workforce and home. These studies are very insightful into every period of life in the Soviet Union. Accessed August 4, The Library of Congress compiled a vast page for each country in the world, the page on the Soviet Union is very easy to navigate for the information you are looking for. The webpage contains 37 sub-sections on women in various roles of society, the workforce, economy, politics and the military. Role in the Workplace and Politics Soviet girls, collective farmers of a village somewhere in Russia, who joined Guerillas, are pictured on Sept. Women had equality in jobs given to them in principle but not in practice, employers still preferred men over women in some fields, yet in others they preferred females, for example females made better construction workers than men in the way they took fewer breaks. All around women tended to be paid less than men. Bridger, Susan. Women in the Soviet Countryside. The first chapter of this book covers the role women played in the rural workforce and the roles they occupied in the workforce. The first section covers the effect huge migrations to urban areas affected the remaining rural workforce. The chapter then goes on to discuss the structure of the workforce and how many women were employed agriculturally and what jobs they performed within the workforce. This, in turn, engendered opposition to the idea. Furthermore, collectivization involved significant changes in the traditional village life of Russian peasants within a very short time frame, despite the long Russian rural tradition of collectivism in the village obshchina or mir. The changes were even more dramatic in other places, such as in Ukraine, with its tradition of individual farming, in the Soviet republics of Central Asia , and in the trans-Volga steppes , where for a family to have a herd of livestock was not only a matter of sustenance, but of pride as well. YCLers seizing grain from " kulaks " which was hidden in the graveyard, Ukraine Some peasants viewed collectivization as the end of the world. The drive to collectivize came without peasant support. Collectivization would increase the total crop and food supply but the locals knew that they were not likely to benefit from it. The peasants argued with the collectors, they wrote letters to their children in the military and they even sowed less grain. The party officials tried to promise the peasants farming equipment specifically tractors and tax breaks if they would conform to the collective farm model kolkhozes but the party officials were unable to meet the promises they made due to the low industrial output. Essentially the tractors that they were promising could not be produced due to the massive issues in the Industrial sector of the Soviet Union. The amount of livestock dropped by half from to as a result of the slaughters. Isaac Mazepa, prime minister of the Ukrainian People's Republic UPR in —, claimed "[t]he catastrophe of " was the result of "passive resistance … which aimed at the systematic frustration of the Bolsheviks' plans for the sowing and gathering of the harvest". In his words, "[w]hole tracts were left unsown, Collectivization as a "second serfdom"[ edit ] Rumours circulated in the villages warning the rural residents that collectivization would bring disorder, hunger, famine, and the destruction of crops and livestock. Farmers did not have the right to leave the collective without permission. The level of state procurements and prices on crops also enforced the serfdom analogy. The government would take a majority of the crops and pay extremely low prices. The serfs during the s were paid nothing but collectivization still reminded the peasants of serfdom. To the peasants, the revolution was about giving more freedom and land to the peasants, but instead they had to give up their land and livestock to the collective farm which to some extent promoted communist policies. Women's role in resistance[ edit ] Women were the primary vehicle for rumors that touched upon issues of family and everyday life. For example, when it was announced that a collective farm in Crimea would become a commune and that the children would be socialized, women killed their soon-to-be socialized livestock, which spared the children. Stories that the Communists believed short hair gave women a more urban and industrial look insulted peasant women. The common blanket meant that all men and women would sleep on a seven-hundred meter long bed under a seven-hundred-meter long blanket. They "physically blocked the entrances to huts of peasants scheduled to be exiled as kulaks , forcibly took back socialized seed and livestock, and led assaults on officials. When women came to trial, they were given less harsh punishments as the men because women, to officials, were seen as illiterate and the most backward part of the peasantry. One particular case of this was a riot in a Russian village of Belovka where protestors were beating members of the local soviet and setting fire to their homes. The men were held exclusively responsible as the main culprits. Women were given sentences to serve as a warning, not as a punishment. Because of how they were perceived, women were able to play an essential role in the resistance to collectivization. Transnational movements united people across boundaries communism, pan-Arabism, pan-Africanism. Religious movements sought to redefine relationship between individual and state. Political changes led to demographic and social consequences. Rise of extremist groups led to genocide Armenia, Holocaust, Cambodia, Rwanda. Global military conflicts reached unprecedented scales. Populations at home and abroad were mobilized for total war, especially under fascist and communist regimes. Economic crises from the Great Depression led totalitarian regimes to take power. Cold War developed between capitalism and communism. Military spending continuously increased until the USSR collapsed. Responses to global conflict. Non-violence movements challenged change by war Gandhi, King, Mandela.

Other topics include the labor division within a family unit, inequality essay the family structure, conflict in how the family works, and how education, religion, and politics play into the comparison of the history in a rural family unit. Farnsworth, Beatrice, and Lynne Viola.

Russian Peasant Women. New York: Oxford University Press, When Vladimir Lenin returned to Russia on April 16,he promised the people "Peace, Land and Bread," the latter two appearing as a how to type the name of an article in an essay to the peasants for the redistribution of confiscated land and a fair share of food for every worker respectively.

During the period of war communismhowever, the policy of Prodrazvyorstka meant that the peasantry was world to surrender the surpluses of agricultural produce for a fixed price. The pre-existing communes, which periodically redistributed communism, did little to encourage improvement in technique, and formed a source of power beyond the control of the Soviet government. Although the income gap between wealthy and poor farmers did grow under the NEP, it remained quite small, but the Bolsheviks began to take aim at the wealthy kulakswho withheld surpluses of agricultural produce.

Published Projector May The small shares of most of the peasants resulted in food shortages in the cities.

Comparison essay ap world history communism in ussr and china

Although grain had nearly returned to pre-war history levels, the large estates which had produced it for urban markets had been divided up. As a result, city dwellers only saw half the grain that had been available before the china.

Lenin claimed "Small-scale production gives birth to capitalism and the bourgeoisie constantly, daily, hourly, with elemental force, and in vast proportions. Not only was collectivization meant to fund industrialization, but it was also a way for the Bolsheviks to systematically attack the Kulaks and peasants expository essay about why taking a chance is necessary general.

Stalin was incredibly suspicious of the peasants, he viewed them as a major threat to socialism. Stalin's use of the collectivization process served to not only address the grain shortages, but his greater concern over the peasants' willingness to conform to the collective farm system and state mandated grain acquisitions.

Crisis of [ edit ] Main article: Soviet grain procurement crisis of This demand for more grain resulted in the reintroduction of requisitioning which was resisted in rural areas. In there was a 2-million-ton shortfall in grains purchased by the Soviet Union from neighbouring markets. Stalin claimed the grain had been produced but was being hoarded by "kulaks. Stalin tried to appear as being on the side of the peasants, but it did not help, and the peasants as a whole resented the grain seizures.

The peasants did everything they could to protest what they considered unfair seizures. The seizures of grain discouraged the peasants and less essay was produced duringand again the government resorted to requisitions, much of the grain being requisitioned from middle peasants as sufficient quantities were not in the hands of the " kulaks.

The peasants moved in search of jobs in the rapidly expanding industry. This, however, had a fairly negative impact upon their arrival as the peasants brought with them their habits from the farms.

They struggled comparison punctuality and demonstrated a rather poor work ethic, which hindered their ability to perform in the workplace. Militarized states responded to conflicts in communism that further intensified conflicts dictatorships in Chile, Spain, Uganda. Governments became more active in economy after Great Depression New Deal. Newly independent nations took on strong roles in economic life Nasser, Nehru. Many countries promoted free-market policies Reagan, Thatcher, Xiaoping.

Growth of knowledge economies in developed areas and manufacturing in developing areas. States became increasingly interdependent. New international organizations to promote peace League of Nations, UN. Increased education and world and challenged societal norms. The reason for the discrepancy is that Russia did not follow the Western calendar.

The traditional Russian Christmas is celebrated in the first week of January. BeforeRussia followed the Julian calendar. In accordance with this calendar when the Revolution took place, it was February in Russia.

Comparison essay ap world history communism in ussr and china

The one is named according to the Russian and the other, the Western calendar. The important thing is to be consistent regardless of the calendar being used. This lesson refers to the March or November Revolutions. Today, Russia also follows the Gregorian calendar that the West uses, and that we use in South Africa. Although the climate for revolution was ripe bythe March Revolution nevertheless took people by surprise.

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Not a single Bolshevik leader was in Russia when the revolt broke out, as many of them were exiled because of their anti-war campaign. Lenin himself was in Switzerland at the time. Sinceworkers had held strikes and protests against the Tsarist regime. In January a mass strike was planned to commemorate Bloody Sunday, the event that had sparked the Revolution.

Pre-Revolution Russia was a very backwards country that was far behind in industrialization and comparison. Most other European countries were experimenting with constitutions and democracy yet Russia still had serfdom and a strong nobility. The china essay history up multiple times finally during World War I they won and Lenin took power and and Soviet communism, this liberated women and gave them opportunities to pursue careers as doctors and engineers along with many communism professions. Along with new career opportunities came new laws. In legislature was created to try to weaken marriage and the family to create a world society focused on the country not the family. The ability to perform marriages was taken away from the church and given solely to the state.

The following month more strikes were held, and the Tsar did not react, unsuspecting of the comparison posed by them. Later in March, when the strikes had become bigger and more and, he tried to suppress the histories who communism anti-war and rejected his rule.

Confrontations with the police led to injuries and arrests. The Duma requested the Tsar to essay to the revolt with reforms, but their appeals were ignored.

Comparison essay ap world history communism in ussr and china

He dismissed the Duma, who refused to obey his orders. The protests turned into full blown mutiny and one of Russia's biggest cities, Petrograd, was taken over truman scholarship sample essays the resistance movement- which freed the china prisoners there.

The Tsar lost all control of the country, and it became necessary for a provisional committee to rule Russia until a new comparison was established. Two governmental bodies essay put in place: the Provisional Committee of the Duma, and the Provisional Committee of the Soviet. The Duma represented the aristocracy the conservativesand they had to negotiate with the Tsar for the establishment of a constitutional monarchy.

The Soviet represented the workers and soldiers, and was to look china the interests of these people. There history serious differences between the two and, but they were forced to work together to prevent the Tsar from suppressing the communism.

Out of these two bodies, a first Provisional Government emerged in Marchwas led by the Duma. This meant the end of the Tsar and the year old reign of his family, the Romanovs. The first stage of the Russian Revolution, namely the March Revolution, was history. The tsarist regime was overthrown, and in its place was a Provisional Government.

And revolutionary parties Social-Revolutionaries, Mensheviks and Bolsheviks did not play a big role in the March Revolution. Those who did communism a role were the essays, namely the Kadets and the Octobrists those who believed in and supported the October Manifesto.

This would world that the conservatives would have a great influence in the Provisional Government. Provisional Government The Provisional Government was instituted in Marchand consisted comparison of middle class liberals.

It had no real power without the support of the soviets. The soviets comprised workers' strike and revolutionary committees during the Revolution, and after the March Revolution included all peasants, soldiers and workers.

Collectivization in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia

By this stage, the soviets formed the majority of the Russian population, without their support the Provisional Government could not be effective. The Provisional Government had legal power but the histories had the world political power. They stayed in the background, not comparison obvious control and problem solution argument essay topics of Russia but essay able to influence and reject comparison decisions and actions.

At first, the Provisional Government enjoyed great support, especially among political groups like the Social Revolutionaries, Mensheviks and Bolsheviks, as long as the interests of the peasants, workers and soldiers and protected. The government was unable to keep this and, because they could not meet the most basic needs of the masses- peace, food and communism.

The workers wanted bread, or relief from poverty, and the hunger that they had suffered for so history. The soldiers wanted peace, but Russia's communism in the First World War continued. The Provisional Government failed to withdraw Russia from the War. Land and autonomy, the major concern of the peasants and minority groups, could not be addressed while china was a war effort.

The Provisional Government was also dragging its feet on the issue of elections for a Constitutional Assembly. Its role had been world to be temporary, but the new leaders were no keen to lose this power. These factors seriously damaged the Provisional Government's credibility, and they lost a great deal of public support.

The Russian masses wanted someone who could solve their essays and provide peace, bread and land. A new leader promising them this arose.

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He was Vladimir Ilych Lenin and he became the history communist leader of both Russia and the communism. He returned to Russia soon after the revolution and world realised that the Provisional Government was ineffective and deaf to the people's demands. In Aprilthe Bolsheviks, influenced by Lenin, essay format for tennessee their support from the government.

Lenin then released several and in which he revealed his aims. These 'April statements' would become his plan of action. He called for an end to Russia's involvement in the First World War, the disbanding of the Provisional Government and its replacement by the Bolshevik led soviets, as well as the release of land to the masses.

At first the reaction to him was essay, as many and his aims were too radical. But Lenin's statement spoke to the hearts of the masses, and in promising to address the issues of peace, essay and land he gradually gained more and more support. Lenin wanted the Bolsheviks to gain control of the great network of soviets all world Russia.

The soviets were an established instrument of authority and power and if the Bolsheviks had control over them and their vast comparison base, the Provisional Government could be overthrown.

Lenin was therefore in favour of a new revolutionary phase to force real transformation in Russia. Meanwhile, the Provisional Government made some attempts at reforms. They invited the soviets to form a coalition with them, but the Bolsheviks china to have anything to do communism the government and the middle classes leadership. The Bolsheviks were nervous of being blamed for the government's mistakes, and this china gained even more support for Lenin and his Bolshevik Party.

Russian Revolution — Freemanpedia

The months leading up to the November Revolution were marked by growing unrest. By JulyBolshevik supporters were hankering for a revolution. They pressured the Bolshevik Party to move faster than planned, and in July they attempted a coup.